Shop Dogs Conduct Annual Employee Reviews in Preparation for Independent Bookstore Day

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Hello, everyone. I, Opie, boss-dog of the shop dogs here at Parnassus Books, would like to thank you for joining me for this important business discussion. Let’s begin by having this year’s canine staff performance review, so that all of our four-legged booksellers can get their game in top form before this Saturday’s big event, Independent Bookstore Day. Read the rest of this entry »

50 Staff-Picked Books For Readers of All Ages

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Love mysteries and thrillers? Known to stay up far too late, entangled in a family story or a quirky romance? Are you a literary fiction fan or a sucker for little-known histories? Or maybe you’ve got a young reader at home who’s ready to be spellbound by a new story. Look no further. Your next read is right inside this HUGE new list of bookseller recommendations. Read the rest of this entry »

“A Time of Firsts” — Meg Wolitzer on Her New Novel, The Female Persuasion

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A recent profile on novelist Meg Wolitzer in The New York Times noted that “at a time when our attention is so easily splintered, [Wolitzer] writes big, substantial, old-fashioned books that allow her characters room to breathe, change and grow into adulthood and beyond.” While Wolitzer’s 10th novel, The Female Persuasion, may feel retro in size and scope, read it and you’ll see it delves into themes both timeless and contemporary. Read the rest of this entry »

Surviving the Ordinary: Why We Need Memoirs of Regular Lives

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Click over to Lit Hub today, where Musing editor Mary Laura Philpott contributes an essay about memoirs. Here’s an excerpt:

I am 100 percent here for a good stranger-than-fiction memoir. Do I want to know how someone escaped a cult, pulled off a heist, or became famous after surviving a freak accident? Absolutely. Send me your tales of life-and-death adventure. But I also want to read about the lives (and deaths) of people who face nothing extraordinary at all, whose stories exemplify the challenges and realities of common, daily existence. High stakes make for great reading, but examine any life, and you’ll see the stakes get pretty high for all of us at some point, even if the only decisions we ever make are the ones billions of people have made before us and billions will make again. It’s not novelty that draws me to a memoir, at least not always. Read the rest of this entry »

Her Voice, At Last: Authors Madeline Miller and Victoria Schwab Discuss Miller’s New Novel, Circe

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We’ve admired Madeline Miller’s work since she made her debut with the highly acclaimed novel The Song of Achilles. In fact, we loved the spellbinding tale so much that we chose it for our very first Signed First Editions Club selection. As it happens, we were just as blown away by Miller’s second book, Circeso we couldn’t resist picking it as a First Editions Club favorite, too.  Read the rest of this entry »

Cover Reveal! Nashville: Scenes from the New American South

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Today’s post from Ann Patchett includes your first look at her new book with photographer Heidi Ross (right), featuring an introduction by Jon Meacham (left).

I’d worked with Liz Sullivan before. She’s an executive editor at Harper Collins, the person who handles the art books. Four years ago when I wanted to edit a collection of essays based around the photography of my friend Melissa Ann Pinney, I went to Liz. She was tough and exacting and in possession of a flawless sense of design. What we wound up with is TWO, a truly gorgeous piece of work. After we were finished, Liz and I stayed friends. These days we mostly talk about our dogs, though sometimes the conversation veers towards chocolate. Read the rest of this entry »

Jason Reynolds and David Arnold: An Interview For Every One

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Jason Reynolds believes kids who think they hate reading “don’t actually hate books, they hate boredom.” So he has made a pledge to his young readers: never to write boring books. His plan is working so well that not only have his novels become favorites among kids and teens everywhere, but they’ve been honored so many times we can’t fit all the awards in this intro (a Newbery Honor, the Coretta Scott King Author Award, and a finalist for the National Book Award, to name just a few). Lucky for Nashville, Reynolds is coming to Parnassus on Tuesday, April 10, 2018, to celebrate of the release of his two newest books: Sunny and For Every One. Read the rest of this entry »